Canada Protection Plan

Lack of lighting a safety concern at Sunderland area intersection

Brock Township will be putting pressure on the City of Kawartha Lakes to help cover the cost of installing a streetlight at the intersection of Simcoe Street and Concession 6 Brock.
At Monday’s (Dec. 10) meeting of the public works and facilities committee, members of township council received a report from staff from the neighbouring municipality that noted the intersection does not meet the requirements for a street light.
Mayor Debbie Bath-Hadden and Ward 5 Councillor Lynn Campbell both disagreed with that appraisal.
“I would rather illuminate that intersection…before we have a fatality there,” Mayor Bath-Hadden said.
“It’s a very bad corner,” Coun. Campbell added, noting that safety issues primarily arise in the evening or during snowstorms.
Works Director Nick Collucci explained that as the Simcoe Street serves as a boundary between the two municipalities, projects are typically cost-shared. But since it doesn’t meet the warrants required, the cost of installing a street light would likely fall solely on the Township.
“But that doesn’t preclude this council from including it in the budget deliberations and paying for 100 percent,” he said.
As Concession 6 links Simcoe Street to Highway 12 and runs directly into Sunderland, Colucci added that the Township secured funding through Central Counties Tourism for larger wayfinding signs that will be erected in the spring.
“Hopefully that will provide a better monument so people know where the intersection is,” he said.
Regional Councillor Ted Smith tried to table the issue until budget deliberations but did not receive the required support from his colleagues.
“I think it’s taken our friends at Kawartha Lakes about three or four years to respond to this (request),” Coun. Campbell said in speaking against the option to table the matter.
Instead, the Township will send a letter to Kawartha Lakes specifically requesting that the cost of the streetlight be split between the two municipalities.
“I don’t like to take ‘No’ for an answer – I like to solve problems,” Coun. Campbell said.
“I think we need to word our request a little stronger,” Mayor Bath-Hadden added.

Appeal against Sunderland subdivision will proceed

A group of Sunderland residents are continuing their fight against council’s decision to allow an additional 61 homes in a controversial subdivision in the village.

Back in September, the law firm of Davies Howe filed an appeal on behalf of the Jay Yerema-Weafer and the ‘Concerned Citizens of Sunderland’ regarding a zoning amendment that would allow the Kaitlin Corporation to build 268 homes in the second phase of construction, an increase from the 207 initially approved.